“Just Shoot Me” Isn’t a Plan

The Leonard Florence Center for Living, Chelsea, MA
The Leonard Florence Center for Living, Chelsea, MA

How often have you shuddered at the prospect of being terribly frail, living in a nursing home, and then said to your spouse, your kids, your partner, your close friends, “If I ever get like that, just shoot me?” I’ll admit to having said that, myself, on a few occasions.

The fact is, at some point, most of us are going to need some kind of assistance at some point in late life. Boomers may not have the luxury that our parents did, of being tended by adult children or other family members. Families may live too far from one another to enable that day-to-day caregiving. Many boomers – including a sizable LGBT population – do not have children to depend on at all. And whether in future years there will be a sufficient number of skilled home health aides to assist us in our own homes remains an open question.

The good news is that in the course of researching my book, “Last Comforts: Notes From the Forefront of Late-Life Care,” I learned that there are viable alternatives to conventional nursing homes and that they focus more on “home” than on “nursing” in design, operation and management.

Sometimes they’re called “households” or “small houses.” The Green House is one of the better-known variations on the theme of alternative nursing facilities. (www.thegreenhouseproject.org) Instead of a nursing station dominating a floor, a kitchen and common dining and living areas cater to residents who have their own bedrooms and bathrooms. A floor – often called a “neighborhood” — might include 10 to 20 bedrooms. These homes are distinguished for their person-centered care. So, residents’ own preferences dictate their schedules – that is, they can awaken when they want, eat when they want, spend time how they want to. Aides may be referred to as “universal workers,” and are given more responsibilities (and training) than aides in conventional nursing homes.

The nearly 95,000-square-foot Leonard Florence Center for Living in Chelsea, Massachusetts, which has been open since 2010, is a case in point. (www.chelseajewish.org) It cares for 100 residents in 10 “houses” (its term for “neighborhood”) of 10 people apiece. Three of the houses serve people who need short-term rehabilitation. One of the houses serves people living with ALS; another serves people with multiple sclerosis (MS).

The building’s first floor is its “Main Street,” with a bakery, deli, spa and chapel; each house also has its own communal area for games, social gatherings and other events. Each house also offers made-to-order Kosher meals; menus are designed jointly with residents and staff.

There are roughly 15,500 nursing homes in the U.S. that serve about 1.4 million residents at any given time; “household” style nursing homes that embrace culture change currently represent a very small fraction of the total number of long-term care residences in this country. So the question that arises is: Can these models grow substantially over the next 20 years so that we will come to expect this level of care as the norm? The nonprofit sector has led the way in this arena. It’s time for the private sector, which accounts for two-thirds of the nursing facilities in the country, to pay attention.

2 thoughts on ““Just Shoot Me” Isn’t a Plan”

  1. Bravo, Ellen! This is a short, sweet and very much to the point. And I think _“Just Shoot Me” Isn’t a Plan_ (https://lastcomforts.com/2016/01/13/just-shoot-me-isnt-a-plan/) should become a mantra. But as you say, there’s hope; there are alternatives out there. If only the private sector will pay attention and step up to the plate. Is the key (duh?) how to make money from alternative nursing facilities? Isn’t that all too frequently the stumbling block? Well done, El. And thanks for passing along. Wilma by _Ellen Rand_ (https://lastcomforts.com/author/lastcomfortsauthor/)

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  2. Very astute thinking. I live in a CCRC & we soon be going under a redevelopment program in which we (I hope) have a memory care, alzhimer unit & assisted living area. Personally I prefer the Greenhouse project but I happily will accept the Neighborhood Plan.

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