Category Archives: nursing homes

6 Steps To Take for Better End-of-Life Care

I was honored recently to be asked by the Berkeley, California-based Greater Good Science Center to do an essay, based on my experiences as a hospice volunteer and reporting/researching my book. Here are the highlights:

* Educate yourself about the different key treatments for end-of-life care, so that you can make informed decisions.
* Start conversations with loved ones so that they are clear about your wishes for care.
* Understand the benefits of palliative care and hospice care and know when to ask for them.
* Learn how to communicate effectively with doctors and medical staff.
* Research nursing and assisted living facilities in your community, in case you need them.
* Advocate for better end-of-life care for everyone.

You can read the full essay here

You’re In a Nursing Home. Now What?

I’m a big believer in the benefits of person-centered culture change in long-term care settings like nursing homes, where the aim is to focus more on the feeling of “home” than on “nursing.” According to the Eden Alternative , a nonprofit organization that promotes, supports and teaches about person-centered culture change, currently there are 190 skilled nursing facilities on its registry, 45 percent owned and operated by for-profit companies and 55 percent by nonprofit, county and government sponsors.

But these homes still represent a small fraction of the total number of skilled nursing facilities in the U.S. What if you, or someone you love, must make the transition to a nursing home now?

Fortunately, many excellent resources are available to guide you in making your choice. Deeply buried in Medicare’s Nursing Home Compare website, for example, is an excellent 56-page booklet called “Your Guide to Choosing a Nursing Home or Other Long-Term Care.” Fewer resources are available to guide you about how to live well once you’re there, however.

That’s where Eleanor Feldman Barbera, PhD, comes in. A seasoned nursing home psychologist, “Dr. El,” as she calls herself on her website and blog, says that her goal is “to make long-term care a place I’d want to live when it’s my turn.” She is called in to work with residents if they are causing trouble – e.g., arguing with staff members or other residents, or refusing to take medications, or participating in rehab, or are depressed.

Her approach is one of empathy, pragmatism and humor. Sometimes it’s a matter of residents adjusting to the reality of not being able to do everything for themselves, she pointed out.

Generally, she advises having patience and reasonable expectations. “Come in with an open mind,” she said. “Try to partner with the team as much as possible.” While in person-centered homes your schedule revolves around you, your preferences and interests, that is not the case in conventional facilities, where schedules are set by the institution. So here’s one hint: be cognizant of the home’s schedule and when you need assistance, try to seek it before shift change times, when aides and nursing staff are particularly busy.

There’s more advice in Dr. Barbera’s book, “The Savvy Resident’s Guide: Everything You Wanted to Know About Your Nursing Home Stay But Were Afraid to Ask.”
In more than 20 years of doing this work, Dr. Barbera told me. she’s seen little movement toward culture change in long-term settings, although now people seem to at least be aware of the concept. “It needs leadership at the top that believes in it,” she said. “It needs a constant push in that direction.”

One thing that might spur change is the sheer size of the aging baby boomer generation. In Dr. Barbera’s view, boomers are thinking differently about their own late life prospects. Generally, she said, they demand more service, have higher expectations, are more litigious and feel freer to speak out when they perceive something happening that isn’t right. Perhaps they will want co-habitation with other elders, or inviting college students to live with them, she said.

Or, perhaps knowing about the existence of person-centered care alternatives, they will begin to insist that conventional nursing home operators begin to embrace its principles.

To find a long-term care facility near you, go to the Eden Alternative Registry

And if you want to get a better sense of how a nursing home works when it embraces person-centered culture change, do take the time to watch this 22-minute video, Perham: Welcome Home. Located in Minnesota, the home includes six “households” of 16 residents each.

“Just Shoot Me” Isn’t a Plan

The Leonard Florence Center for Living, Chelsea, MA
The Leonard Florence Center for Living, Chelsea, MA

How often have you shuddered at the prospect of being terribly frail, living in a nursing home, and then said to your spouse, your kids, your partner, your close friends, “If I ever get like that, just shoot me?” I’ll admit to having said that, myself, on a few occasions.

The fact is, at some point, most of us are going to need some kind of assistance at some point in late life. Boomers may not have the luxury that our parents did, of being tended by adult children or other family members. Families may live too far from one another to enable that day-to-day caregiving. Many boomers – including a sizable LGBT population – do not have children to depend on at all. And whether in future years there will be a sufficient number of skilled home health aides to assist us in our own homes remains an open question.

The good news is that in the course of researching my book, “Last Comforts: Notes From the Forefront of Late-Life Care,” I learned that there are viable alternatives to conventional nursing homes and that they focus more on “home” than on “nursing” in design, operation and management.

Sometimes they’re called “households” or “small houses.” The Green House is one of the better-known variations on the theme of alternative nursing facilities. (www.thegreenhouseproject.org) Instead of a nursing station dominating a floor, a kitchen and common dining and living areas cater to residents who have their own bedrooms and bathrooms. A floor – often called a “neighborhood” — might include 10 to 20 bedrooms. These homes are distinguished for their person-centered care. So, residents’ own preferences dictate their schedules – that is, they can awaken when they want, eat when they want, spend time how they want to. Aides may be referred to as “universal workers,” and are given more responsibilities (and training) than aides in conventional nursing homes.

The nearly 95,000-square-foot Leonard Florence Center for Living in Chelsea, Massachusetts, which has been open since 2010, is a case in point. (www.chelseajewish.org) It cares for 100 residents in 10 “houses” (its term for “neighborhood”) of 10 people apiece. Three of the houses serve people who need short-term rehabilitation. One of the houses serves people living with ALS; another serves people with multiple sclerosis (MS).

The building’s first floor is its “Main Street,” with a bakery, deli, spa and chapel; each house also has its own communal area for games, social gatherings and other events. Each house also offers made-to-order Kosher meals; menus are designed jointly with residents and staff.

There are roughly 15,500 nursing homes in the U.S. that serve about 1.4 million residents at any given time; “household” style nursing homes that embrace culture change currently represent a very small fraction of the total number of long-term care residences in this country. So the question that arises is: Can these models grow substantially over the next 20 years so that we will come to expect this level of care as the norm? The nonprofit sector has led the way in this arena. It’s time for the private sector, which accounts for two-thirds of the nursing facilities in the country, to pay attention.