A Senior’s Guide to Navigating Medicare for Mental Health Treatment

(Note: This is a guest blog, from Teresa Greenhill, co-creator of MentalHealthForSeniors.com, a website dedicated to providing information on physical and mental fitness.)

Mental health is a serious issue among seniors. In fact, depression affects about 5% of people over 65 as well as up to 13.5% of older adults who require home healthcare. While depression is a common problem, it’s not a normal side effect of growing older. Depression should not be something we simply endure as part of the aging process. If you’re experiencing depression, keep reading to find out how Medicare can help you cover your treatment and support your mental health in the long run.

Mental Health Services Covered by Original Medicare

Original Medicare—also called Medicare Parts A and B—covers a variety of mental health services. Medicare Part A covers the costs of mental health care for hospital inpatients, including therapy and medications administered in a hospital setting. When it comes to outpatient mental health services, Medicare Part B covers one depression screening every year. In addition, it covers psychiatric evaluations, diagnostic tests, medication management, family counseling, and therapy with licensed mental health professionals such as psychiatrists, psychologists, and social workers. However, seniors using these services should be aware of deductibles and copays. After you reach the deductible for Medicare Part B, you will have to pay 20% of the cost for each mental health service.

Unfortunately, Original Medicare alone does not cover prescription drugs or other essential services that can support your mental health treatment. This is why many seniors opt for a Medicare Advantage plan. Medicare Advantage plans offer all the same benefits included in Original Medicare, plus coverage for services like vision, dental, hearing and prescription drugs to help improve your quality of life.

Finding the Right Medicare Plan

There are over 3,700 Medicare Advantage plans available across the United States, so how are you supposed to choose one? Start by making a list of services that you need covered. For example, you may need prescription drug coverage if you’re prescribed medications to treat your depression. If you have vision or hearing problems, make sure your plan covers these services as well—taking care of your physical health is crucial to good mental health. Untreated hearing loss, for instance, can lead to cognitive impairment! Additionally, many Medicare Advantage plans have in-home support services which can significantly improve quality of life for people facing mobility limitations.

Medicare Advantage plans that provide access to wellness programs may also be a good choice for people with depression. Research from McMaster University a public research university in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, shows that staying active plays an important role in treating and preventing depression. Additionally, any senior with Medicare can also take advantage of a free annual wellness visit. During this visit, seniors can discuss prevention strategies with their doctor and develop a personalized plan for avoiding mental illness in the future.

Ensure Your Mental Health Provider Accepts Medicare

Since many psychiatrists opt out of Medicare, you may have trouble finding a mental health professional that accepts your health coverage. Fortunately, U.S. News recommends a few steps patients can take to find the mental health care they need. Start by talking to your primary care provider about your mental health concerns. Your doctor may be able to prescribe medication for your condition and refer you to professionals who they know accept Medicare. If you enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan, ask for a list of covered providers. For seniors who live in rural communities, telepsychiatry is a superior option to forgoing mental health care altogether. This service may be covered by Medicare, depending on where you live.

Is Your Mental Health Service Recognized?

On the other hand, you also need to ensure that your Medicare plan recognizes the mental health services you intend to use. CMS (the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare) recognizes mental health care provided by clinical psychologists, clinical social workers, clinical nurse specialists, psychiatrists, physicians assistants, nurse practitioners, and general practitioners. Non-medical doctors—like social workers and psychologists—must be Medicare-certified. Also, ensure your mental health care provider accepts Medicare’s approved amount for the services they’re providing to you.

Along the same lines, make sure that your Medicare plan will cover your prescription drugs. If you opt to stick with Original Medicare, you can add a prescription drug plan with Medicare Part D. Alternatively, you can choose a Medicare Advantage plan that includes drug coverage—most plans do. Either way, be sure to choose a drug plan that covers your prescriptions. If you cannot find a plan that covers all of your medication, consider choosing a plan that covers your most expensive drugs. It’s also important to check that your plan covers the pharmacy that you would like to get your medications from.

Depression is a serious problem that can accelerate aging and exacerbate age-related physical issues. Fortunately, seniors have several avenues for treatment. And, thanks to Medicare, you don’t have to spend a fortune to receive treatment for depression or any other mental health problems. Don’t hesitate to seek the treatment you need now.

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